The Mind-Body Connection: Is a Healthy Cat a Happy Cat?

Is a happy cat a healthy cat?Every cat is unique. As such, they deserve individualized care that’s tailored to their distinct lifestyle, personality, and potential. Looking at the whole patient, we see that the physical elements of a cat are paramount to longevity – but the emotional and mental health are just as important. In other words, a healthy cat is a happy one, and to celebrate Happy Cat Month this September, we’ve got some feline-centric tips for you.

The Foundation

A young kitten should be examined shortly after adoption. Most shelters will vaccinate, deworm, spay/neuter, and microchip, but we can ensure that a young cat is well on their way toward lifelong health in their first few months. Even indoor-only cats benefit from an up-to-date vaccination schedule.

Your cat’s yearly wellness examination consists of a nose-to-tail physical, and a lengthy discussion of: Continue…

The Best of Both Worlds: How to Engage Your Indoor Cat

engage your indoor catIndoor cats have a pretty good life. They’re safe from the elements and are protected from neighborhood predators and pesky cars. Still, the indoor cat life can be a bit…shall we say, boring? Of course, your cat loves to be with you, but our indoor kitties get far less activity than their outdoor counterparts.

Your cat’s health can actually be impacted by a lack of activity. Obesity, lack of social interaction, and overlooked health issues can all be side effects of an indoor lifestyle. With that in mind, your friends at BEEVET Animal Hospital want to provide some ideas for how to engage your indoor cat.

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A Formidable Foe: Feline Odontoclastic Resorptive Lesions

Feline Odontoclastic Resorptive LesionsCats have a habit of doing things their own way, and it is no different when it comes to dental disease. While they are subject to plaque, tartar, gingivitis, and periodontal disease just like their canine counterparts, they are also prone to a few conditions that are not quite so common in dogs.

Feline odontoclastic resorptive lesions are a progressive condition that we see in our cat patients at BEEVET Animal Hospital. By educating pet owners about this condition, we hope we can encourage more proactive dental health care for all of our patients, feline or not.

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